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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
about the contrast between the u.k. and the united states which i think is revealing, and some world's about -- words about challenges facing the world economy which is more important than those facing individual countries alone. the united kingdom was hit very badly by the financial crisis. total gdp fell by 6% between the peak at the beginning of 2008 and the trough in the second quarter of 2009. output still remains 3% below the peak level. and more than 15% below levels that output would have reached have the long run average growth rate merely continued. on top of that, the inflation rate has been a 2% target. and in the wake of the financial crisis, the budget deficit reached a level of 11% of gdp, a good part of that being structural. we have serious problems to contend with when trying to put in place an economic recovery program in 2009-2010. it was clear at that point that the u.k. needed a major rebalancing of our economy. the shift of spending away from consumption, private and public and toward the net exports whether exports or production to compete with imports. the st
on the royal phone prank in the u.k. radio station has taken the two d.j.s off the air who called the hospital where princess kate was being treated. they duped nurses to thinking they were the queen and prince charles. the nurse who put through their call, her name was saldana found dead of apparent suicide on friday. though they have not released the cause of death. today we are hearing from the first time from the two d.j.s, mel and michael on the death. >> it was never meant to go that far. it was meant to be a silly prank that so many people have done before. this wasn't meant to happen. gone over this a million times in my head that i want to reach out to them and give them a big hug and say sorry. i hope they're okay. it really do. >> what is important right now is that the family and we hope they are doing okay and get the love and support that they deserve and need right now. personally, i'm -- >> dana: police in the u.k. contacted authorities in australia. could they face charges for this? kimberly, we talked in the break. we don't see what the charge could be. >> kimberly: it's too
's royal family turns up dead. we have reaction from the uk and asked if the public ridicule may have played a role in this heartbreaking turn of events. one of our most important allies at risk of losing the democracy that people died for a couple of years ago. we'll look at the future of egypt and what will happen if one of america's most important allies implodes. [chanting] u. call now and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to me, relationships matter. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. [ male announcer ] with these types of plans, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients. plus, there are no networks, and you never need a referral to see a specialist. so don't wait. call now and request this free decision guide to help you better understand medicare... and which aarp medicare s
. >>> guess what it's boxing in the uk, canada and several other country and shoppers are mobbing the stores. these are the crowds in london. the 26th of december is like black friday here in the united states. analysts expect 4 million british shopper also spend nearly $5 billion today, back here at home, it will be a similar scene today as people head to return those unwanted gifts and jump on big post holiday sales and we do mean big. check out this deal from best buy, a 32 inch tv for under $200. those are the kinds of deals we're seeing at major retailers. alison kosik is at the new york stock exchange. tell us more. >> it's like having a flashback to black friday. the deals, everybody killing each other just to get the deals but if you're a retailer you take a big hit on a day like today because the national retail federation says almost 11% of whole day gifts we got are returns. that adds up to $60 billion and a lot of that happens today. it's a busy day for retailers. if you're returning stuff today that's some good news here, most stores are keeping their return policies the same as
looked at the trade deficit, we were, again, lagging and uke sucking popped water. there's a rising deficit stripping our gdp. >> and right now europe is in a relatively deep recession. we're still above water. lou: you jumped all over the punch line because you talk about things not making sense. folks, this is not making sense. i'm delighted because people have wealth left in the equities market, the bond market. how long will that be the case if we go over the cliff? >> won't be the case for long if we have a recession followed by a typical bear market. lou: how long to get to recession -- >> we can get there pretty quick. in fact, some of the down downdrafts are starting to form. we saw those in the q3 gdp numbers were sinking into @%ntraction. lou: 2.7 -- >> employment reports gnar november and december, not surprised if gains in private sector payrolls are well over 100,000 new jobs. lou: that would not be good. baseline at least, i think, for passable is 125. what's your judgment? >> about the same, okay, that's a c-minus grade, get a "c" if we hit 150. lou: might say a "d" l
in the uk. for the first time they're speaking out. they pranked hospital where kate medal torn was admitted for morning sickness. they tricked a nurse into thinking they were prince charles and queen elizabeth. then the deejays got transferred to a colleague who gave them a live medical update on the air. that nurse committed suicide. the deejays are off the air. they gave this interview to an australian television station. listen. >> when you heard the dreadful results following the days after the prank, describe to be how it impacted you. can you remember the words? can you remember physically how you felt? >> unfortunately i remember that moment very well, because i haven't stopped thinking about it since it happened. the question was, was she a mother? >> when you found out that she was, with two children, how -- >> very sorry and saddened for the family. can't imagine what they're going through. >> what about you, michael? >> gutted. you know, shattered, heartbroken. >> does it even feel real to you, what's happened? >> we're still trying to get our heads around everything, you know, t
in the uk where they're out of power for a long time was that they realized they couldn't be the mean party anymore. and the danger for republicans as heart felt as it may be for them to worry about deficits and the survival of this country's economy and the federal government, as meaningful as that is for them, if they're only the party of cuts then they do not speak to the aspirations of the people they want to vote for them. that's why they pull the stunt bs about voter i.d. and anything else. they are deeply offensive and against everything this country stands for in terms of democratic rights. but they actually need to move beyond an agenda of looking tough and sounding tough and frankly heartless to many people who richly deserve and need the help of the federal government. >> now, cynthia, gop consultant mike murphy who in "time" magazine and i'm quoting from what he wrote, the republican brand is dying. we repel latinos, the fastest-growing voter group in the country and our nativist opposition to immigration reform that offers a path to citizenship. we repel younger voters who are
's no different than what happened over in the uk, in my opinion. they had a similar proposal to what we proposed with dollar revenue and $3 worth of spending cuts. they had a cost benefit analysis they did on all the spending programs, they raised the retirement age. they slowed the rate of growth of health care and they tried to get to balance in four or five years. and we thought at the time the debt was too much too quick that amount of austerity would really, you know, lead to a recession. that's why we had as our number one priority in our program that we didn't want to do anything to disrupt a very fragile economic recovery, so we phased ours in. if you do that and if you look at the economic forecast you can see what would happen. you'll probably have economic growth slowed by with about 4%. we're only growing at 2%. so you're automatically in recession. you would have about 2 million more people lose their jobs. that's not something i want to see. and unemployment back to 9%. i think that's absolutely wrong and i think is the kind of thing we should avoid. there's no sense betting the co
approach to swaps regulation, close quote. you ad worked closely with regulators in europe, the u.k. and japan and just recently in october you stated in a speech that the cftc has, quote, consistently engaged with our international counterparts through bilateral and multilateral discussions to promote robust and consistent swap market reform, close quote. recently the regulators of the u.k., france and japan sent the cftc a letter and urged your agency to better coordinate regulation with them and it has been widely reported that regulators of other countries are concerned about your agency's approach. so my question to you is, what happened? >> what happened is what happens in human nature is that not, we don't always agree, partly because we have different underlying statutes. we have different cultures. we have different political systems. . . europe, canada, the u.s. and japan to have central clearing, data reporting and the least here in the u.s. and japan for some of the public's transparency. europe is still focused on that. we are going to -- wherever there is a direct conf
. starbucks has been brought up before parliament in the uk to answer questions about why they are not keeping their tax money at home. the reason is, the tax rates are too high on corporate profit. bring them down and the taxes will stay at home and you won't have it problem at all. >> yeah, i think the real underlying problem is the bad state of the u.s. tax code that forces people it take advantage of things that are legal if not necessarily patriotic. >> these companies are following the rules. nobody is accusing them even of breaking rules. >> it is not illegal. >> we have to expect them to do exactly that. >> fix the underlie be problem and you fix this. then they might actually good to work under this country. >> we should say thank you for doing that. >> jc penney throwing in the towel on no coupons policy. 20% off on friends and family discount over the weekend. has ron johnson finally come around? or too little too late john karner? >> i was a buyer into the story line. when i saw bill akman give his presentation on how jc penney would turn things around with no more coupons, i bough
the the whole -- like a big-time democratic supporter who went to the u.k. [inaudible]. basically the u.s. wealthy are making their arrangements. they understand what's happening here. stuart: you realize both of us with british accents both of us talking about the americans. there's two americans right there. >> that's the american dream. anybody can get off the boat at ellis island and 48 hours later they are telling you americans everything what's wrong with your country. what a great country. charles: i think a lot of people step off the boat embrace what america is all about more than people who are actually born in this country. i think we keep complaining that the wealthy, on the buffett end, yeah they support obama because it helps their guilt and they could afford it. the other wealthy, the 250,000, they are stuck between a rock and a hard place. to mark's point, anyone out there who does not think that at some point we're going to come around 200,000, 150,000. stuart: hold on a second. under obama care the taxes which will pay for it go into effect on january 1st, three, four
gaming in the u.k. jumping 3%, nike agree representation of retail which is under pressure across the board, apple down $8 and bank of america of the no. one performer on the dow jones industrials up 2%. dennis: thank you. growing pessimism with less than a week until the fiscal cliff deadline. 50% of americans say we would get a deal, 48% saying it is a no go according to a new gallup poll and that is a big change from a poll conducted last week. we are joined by washington bureau chief jerry side. john bbehner and republicans were unable to do it. now the focus and pressure shifts to the senate and the democrats. >> in the senate is democrats and republicans because last year when we were in this fix couldn't get out of the debt ceiling crisis it was harry reid, the democrat leader in the senate and mcconnell, the republican leader who emerged as adults in the room and worked up something that got through congress. we are on the verge of something like that or at least an attempt to replicate that. how much of a role will whitehouse play, might just be as in 2011 the two senate
, the euro moving higher still under 130. the uk pound moving higher. the dollar down against all these currencies. we will be right back. >> 20 minutes past the hour, this is your fox news minutes. a navy seal dead after u.s. and nato operation could not a doctorate in eastern afghanistan. a member of the seal team six elite unit known to take out usama bin laden. the ducks american was safely removed after being held by the taliban. egyptian government reportedly allow the military to arrest civilians. the move is an attempt to safeguard the constitutional referendum for saturday. the order was to protect violence temporarily until the referendum resulted. manufacturing has been hit hard because of u.s. sanctions. facing financial crisis in the last four years. dissuading the nation from continuing uranium enrichment. those are your headlines. back to ashley. ashley: thank you very much. holiday sales hitting record numbers, but even an upbeat shopping season won't be the saving grace for some retailers so what does that mean for your portfolio? sandra smith has a look at the wi
the key here. 31 daily nonstop flights. that's all part of what goes between the uk and north america for virgin atlantic. the brand remains, guys. make that clear here. the virgin atlantic brand does not go away. what changes is that delta has a 49% stake in the company. there's going to be a press conference later this morning here in new york. we're going to be talking with delta ceo richard anderson, and "squawk on the street" a little later on this morning. but this is a big deal in terms of what's happening with the airlines, and that international consolidation that we've all been expecting. guys, back to you. >> before you go, real quick. how much is this going to really impact delta, singapore air, which had this stake, was unhappy ultimately, because they didn't have the control that they really needed. or thought that they needed. >> i think richard anderson believes he will have the control. also singapore airlines, many believe that it did not utilize the access to heathrow as effectively as delta will be able to in terms of flights between north america, and heathrow. so
if any laws were broken. >> who knows what the laws in australia and u.k. are? when i listen to those ryan roses things and that's happening live. i don't think they're getting anybody's permission to do anything. >> gretchen: you're a standup comedienne as well. >> my comedy -- i'm not a mean comic. i think if i make fun of anybody, it's myself most of the time. and i think you never know how people going to react when you're cruel. my father always said this, you never know what's going on behind somebody's eyes. and you tonight. you don't know what they've come into a room with. so look, a million times we've predicted the end of iron glee this country. i don't think this is the end of anything in this country. there are always people who are willing to go to extremes to get a laugh. i hope people will consider the possibility of what the results might be. this is something that will probably never happen again. it is a unique, unusual, very singular occurrence. >> eric: you're going to be on "glee"? >> i'm going to be on "glee"! i'm super excited. ryan murphy is an incredible tale
're covering it in the u.k. and seeing it on tv and probably brings back really bad memories for him, but if i am a parent of one of those kids who witnessed such carnage at newtown and i see andy murray mentally healthy, successful, dealing with it all, you know, seemingly -- >> it is not something brought up either because of the fact, you're right, he is like every other tennis player out there. he has his bad days, his good days. he was one of the most emotional responses ever at wimbledon when he addressed the crowd and thanked him after he was beat this year and he was tearful and then the joy at the olympics, him winning the gold medal at the london games. he has had an up and down year and to end the year like this is truly amazing and i am interested to see what part if any he wants to have in these family's lives. >> i hope some. he is prove you can be okay. >> that's a great point. he is proof that you can go on from something as horrific as this and he wasn't in the other end. he was walking to the gymnasium. 30 seconds later he may have been one of those kids who was tragically ki
europe and people in the u.k. and throughout the world. my hope is we are going to get the deal done. >> we have three weeks or so to play with at least this year some say. is that feasible knowing what you know? >> i think what you have to realize is there has to be a down payment. president outlined what he wants for that down payment on revenue side. let's have rates go back up which was the underlying assumption that was included in the whole simpson-bowles plan. the gang of six plan embraced that as well. brought the rates back up to 39%. you could still do tax reform after that to bring them back down and eliminate the tax expenditures. that's a good starting point. will we fully get through tax reform and entitlement reform by the end of the year? obviously not. what i fear is let's not continue to negotiate this into the 11th hour. every day that we go on during this period, during retail season, you hold back consumers which we know consumer confidence is two-thirds of the economy. folks are not buying stuff because they don't know what will happen come the beginning of the
for that company for autonomy. the uk unit of deloitte was in charge of signing off on autonomy's financial statements also before hp bought the company in 2011. but deloitte was also paid significant fees for other work it did for autonomy like due diligence work on a potential acquisition and to many observers the multitasking is potentially an industry problem. >>> let's take a look at stocks to watch this morning. we'll start with the first one, we'll look at enbridge which at this point is not doing a whole lot. it's indicated up 0.3 of a percent. enbridge has raised its dividend by 12% and it sees strong growth in its outlook for next year. next on the list which is coming up now is cooper. cooper fourth quarter profit rising 27% on continued contact lens sales. so, this is -- there's, like, six different coopers at one point. this is the contact lens. there's cooper tire. >> different one. >> cooper company, and cooper. >> dan, when you take a look at everything that's out there, everything that's happening in the economy, what's happening with washington, what's your biggest concern
when it came out almost two years ago. we said that the uk consolidation would fail. it had too much revenue. as we are seeing now, millionaires and billionaires are heading for the exit. that is what we are going to see. >> thank you. mr. chairman, i yield back. >> i would like to congratulate the chairman on his election and the fine work he has done as chairman of this committee and to congratulate mr. brady on being selected as his chair of this committee and the next congress. for our distinguished witnesses, they agreed that what we need to do is have a long- term solution. i would like to ask dr. zandi how we achieve that. we are several million dollars apart from the president's proposal. how would you close that gap? proposalhe president's and speaker boehner's proposal. how can we get people employed and move our economy forward? >> i apologize. there will be a fair amount of numbers here. the president's tax revenue proposal amounts to about $1.6 trillion over a 10-year period. that is from higher tax rates. roughly 600 billion are from some kind of tax reform. they are al
look particularly appealing here, due in part to signs of resilience in u.k. gdp growth. so we've had the european close. meantime, bob joins me here at post nine with a look at not just europe but what we're doing here state side. >> sort of moving sideways and consolidating. a little news on night capital. just got off the phone with tommy joyce, who is now the executive chairman. take a look at night here. remember the deal. they've sold. they sold to geico here. a rather complicated deal. a two-to-one cash to ratio stock. again, i did talk to tommy. he said he'll be working there on a daily basis. none of these absent chairman things. he's going to be a hands-on guy. certainly a relief to everyone. everyone wants tommy joyce involved in their business. dan coleman will be spending half his time in chicago and half his time in jersey city. very interesting dynamic going on here. sort of a working partnership between the two of them. tommy insisted to me this is a complementary merger. that is true. given it's $720 million or so, how are you going to pay for it? are they going to se
in the subset than in australia and the u.k., they tend to be only about 10 to 15%. money comes from the private sector in terms of equity, that is. and it really is because the cost of capital for that equity is definitely based on precedent deals north of 10% cost of capital. so for projects like this they would start with grant money first, then maybe any potential subsidized or low cost loans, and then eventually figure out how much more additional capital would be needed and dowled private sector come up with that amount. and given the size of the total project, i think we haven't had the ability to say if that's -- if there is enough capital to do that but in segments and given general interest in rail, i believe if structured appropriately there should be a way to do this. >> but you say 10 to 15% of the total project cost would come from private capital. >> that's right. >> where would the rest come from? >> if you look at some of the examples like the toll roads built in florida a lot of it comes from federal or state funds. it's not to say these are grants but a lot of times they are p
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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